July and August 2018

The trust recorded a total of 1,203 items of media coverage during July and August which reached a combined audience of 32.7 million people.

Here are some of the highlights of the two months:

  • The Daily Mail, The Daily Telegraph, ITV News, the Daily Mirror, the i newspaper and the Daily Echo reported doctors at UHS were among the first in the world to implant and programme a pacemaker using Bluetooth technology. This was also covered by more than 100 local and regional titles across the UK. Read our press release for more information.
  • The Times, The Daily Telegraph (page two), the Daily Mail, the Nursing Times and the Daily Echo reported research by experts in Southampton which found most children and their parents lose more than an hour’s sleep during hospital admissions due to noisy wards. Read our press release here. This was also covered by more than 100 local and regional titles across the UK
  • The Sun, the i newspaper, the Daily Mirror, the Daily Mail, the Daily Star, The Guardian, The Metro, the Daily Record, The Daily Telegraph and the Daily Echo reported consultant urological surgeon Bhaskar Somani’s call for a “radical culture change” towards drinking water to stay hydrated during heatwaves. Read our press release here. This was also covered by more than 200 local and regional titles across the UK. Broadcast: ITV’s Good Morning Britain, BBC Radio Solent, LBC News and Wave 105.
  • The Daily Mail ran a full page feature on a new treatment for knee arthritis which involves injecting patients with a strengthened form of their own blood. Read our press release, first issued in January, for more information.
  • The Sun, the Daily Mail, the Daily Mirror, Medical News Today and ITV News ran items on research by experts in Southampton and Edinburgh which found even low levels of psychological distress may increase the risk of developing some chronic diseases. Read our press release for more information. This was also covered by more than 170 local and regional titles across the UK.
  • A report by UHS asthma expert Prof Stephen Holgate found there was a "striking association" between nine-year-old Ella Kissi-Debrah’s emergency hospital admissions and recorded spikes in nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and PM10s, the most noxious pollutants. Ella died as a result of a fatal asthma attack in 2013.

    This was covered by BBC News, The Independent, The Daily TelegraphThe Guardian, The Times, the Daily Mail and The Sun. Prof Holgate’s research was covered again later in the month by the Daily Mail.