Prof Saul Faust, director NIHR Southampton Clinical Research Facility

Saul FaustActive in infectious disease research, Prof Faust leads the senior management team in ensuring safe and effective conduct of research, strategic development and enabling clinical colleagues’ commercial trial activity.

Email: s.faust@soton.ac.uk

Strategic leadership

Prof Faust drove through a doubling of the facility’s capacity in 2011 and allocation of £9.2m NIHR core funding in 2012, developing the facility’s role as a self-sustaining, national site for enabling better healthcare through early-stage research studies and commercial trials.

Infectious disease research

Prof Faust’s own research focuses on better management of infection in adults and children, including understanding lung infections through our respiratory research programmes, and evaluating vaccines.

Together with Southampton families he has repeatedly delivered on critical national flu vaccine evaluations, fully recruiting within days to rapidly assess these, including H1N1 strain and first use of a four-strain flu vaccine in 2012, as part of the UK academic paediatric vaccine group.  

As honorary consultant paediatrician and professor of paediatric immunology and infectious diseases, Prof Faust is addressing serious conditions and complications caused by infection, that are damaging children’s health but for which few treatment options are available.

Committed to better care for children

Committed to supporting wider clinical research for children, Prof Faust chairs the UK NIHR Medicines for Children Network Clinical Speciality Group for Allergy, Infectious Diseases and Immunity, is paediatric lead for Hampshire and Isle of Wight local research network, and is co-director of the South Central Children’s Research Network (SoCCR).

Career

Prof Faust assumed directorship of the facility after joining the hospital and university in 2007. As an MRC clinical training fellow in paediatric intensive care and infectious diseases, and then clinical lecturer at Imperial College London, he completed his PhD on the pathophysiology of coagulation abnormalities in meningococcal sepsis, work that led directly to clinical trials in paediatric intensive care.