Prof John Fleming, scientific lead for imaging group

Prof Fleming is a clinical scientist working on the use of medical imaging to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients with respiratory disease.

Email: John.fleming@uhs.nhs.uk

John has extensive experience in analysing images using computers, to improve their interpretation and hence their clinical usefulness.

As scientific lead for the imaging group of the NIHR Southampton Biomedical Research Centre, he seeks to develop clinical applications of use of image analysis techniques in lung imaging, in collaboration with medical colleagues.

Focussed on better respiratory care

Prof Fleming's main research interest is in developing the use of medical imaging for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with respiratory disease. He is the scientific lead of the imaging group of the NIHR Southampton Biomedical Research Centre and a consultant to Air Liquide.

National and international roles

Prof Fleming is a reviewer or editorial board member for a number of scientific journals and sits on several national or international advisory panels. He recently took a leading role in developing international guidelines for imaging inhaled aerosol deposition, on behalf of the International Society of Aerosols in Medicine - you can find out more here.

Extensive expertise

He has worked in the field of imaging physics for over 40 years, with particular interest in nuclear medicine, which uses images of radioactive materials distributed in the body to measure the function of various body systems.

This work has included developments in techniques for forming the images, and in the analysis and interpretation of the data. In particular, Prof Fleming has introduced new methods of analysing nuclear medicine images on computers and deriving clinically useful information from them. 

John has published around 140 research articles on these themes. In the UK he initiated an audit scheme for nuclear medicine software and produced guidelines for measurement of glomerular filtration rate.

Career

John obtained a BSc in physics and PhD in medical physics from the University of Southampton. He has worked in Southampton hospitals throughout his career, progressing to head of nuclear medicine physics and medical imaging. He was elected as fellow of the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine in 1988 and appointed at the University as honorary senior lecturer in 1989, reader in 1996 and professor in 2000.