Southampton team supports world's largest COVID-19 treatment trial

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The team, led by Dr Sophie Fletcher, is supporting the delivery of the world’s largest trial into treatments for patients hospitalised with COVID-19, with almost 100 patients recruited in Southampton.

Almost 100 patients recruited in Southampton

The randomised control trial, known as RECOVERY, aims to compare usual care to several different treatments, including a commonly used antibiotic and plasma from those who have recovered from the virus.

To date, the research team has recruited almost 100 patients to take part. It has been a real team effort, with the Trust’s dedicated research team working closely with colleagues on the wards delivering patient care.

Across the UK, more than 25,000 participants have been recruited across 176 sites.

Finding life-saving treatments

The trial, which is running in all UK acute trusts, has already changed clinical practice, identifying the commonly used steroid dexamethasone as the first drug to improve survival rates in certain coronavirus patients.

As coronavirus cases continue to rise, research teams across the UK are encouraging colleagues to ask their COVID-19 patients about taking part in the trial to help get more answers about which treatments improve outcomes for patients.

Dr Sophie Fletcher, a Consultant Respiratory Physician at the Trust who leads the trial locally, said: “We are incredibly proud of our Trust’s commitment to delivering this important research trial.

“To have recruited almost 100 participants is a phenomenal achievement and a tribute to the hard work of colleagues at the Trust, who have been able to work at pace to ensure as many people as possible have the opportunity to take part and try potential treatments against this disease.”

Support the trial

Dr Fletcher added: “Findings from the RECOVERY trial are saving lives and changing practice globally. As cases increase, we want to raise awareness of this important trial, so that more patients have the opportunity to take part.”

To support the trial, talk to the Trust’s R&D department or visit: www.recoverytrial.net

This trial is supported by a grant to the University of Oxford from UK Research and Innovation/National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and by core funding provided by NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, Wellcome, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Department for International Development, Health Data Research UK, the Medical Research Council Population Health Research Unit and NIHR Clinical Trials Unit Support Funding.

Posted on Wednesday 20 January 2021