Pearce, Mr Neil

Neil PearceBM, FRCS, DM, CCST  

Specialty

Gastrointestinal surgery

Training and education

BM, 1990, Southampton (Medical degree)
FRCS 1995 London (Appointed Fellow of Royal College of Surgeons)
DM, 2004 Southampton (Masters degree for research)
CCST 2002 London (Certificate of completion of subspecialist training)

House jobs: Bournemouth and Southampton 1990-1991
Basic surgical training: Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, Devon 1992-1995.
Specialist registrar training: Wessex Region Rotation 1995-03.
Fellowship in liver / transplant surgery: St James’s University Hospital, Leeds 2001-2002.

Sub-specialist training:
Basingstoke 1999-2000, liver, biliary, pancreatic and laparoscopic surgery
Southampton 2000-2001, liver, pancreatic, biliary and laparoscopic surgery
Leeds (St James’s) 2001-2002, liver / transplant, pancreatic and biliary surgery
Southampton 2002-2003, liver, pancreatic, biliary and laparoscopic surgery

Experience

Mr Pearce has worked for the Trust since May 2002.

I believe strongly in the pursuit of clinical excellence through a consultant led service providing close attention to detail. The aim of this approach is to provide a high quality sub specialist service that is tailored to the requirements of the individual patient.

Like most surgeons I would like to have an answer to every clinical problem that I encounter, however, if a patient has a difficult problem that is in an area that I do not specialise in then I always refer the patient to an appropriate colleague.  Similarly I would like to have a surgical solution to all the ailments within my surgical territory, sadly this is not the case; if an operation will not help you I will not offer you one. If I think an operation will help you then I will explain how and why and let you know the benefits and risks associated with it and the results of this type of surgery in my hands.

In addition to my routine liver, pancreas and biliary cancer work I regularly take on some of the most difficult and high risk categories of abdominal surgery. If there is no other effective treatment and the potential benefits are high then I am prepared to assess cases that are inoperable by conventional criteria for surgery, often in collaboration with surgeons from other specialities (e.g. spinal, urology, vascular, cardiac or thoracic surgeons). This kind of extreme surgery is only suitable for certain types of tumour in fit, well motivated patients who are physically and mentally strong enough to face this huge challenge.

Key achievements

I am the Association of Upper GI Surgeons clinical lead for the introduction of new laparoscopic techniques in liver and pancreatic surgery.
UK Liver Surgeons Clinical Commissioning Lead